Street food focus: Baba G's

Street food focus: Baba G's

What?
The crazy lamb jalfrezi burger.

Where?
Baba G’s serves up ‘Indian-inspired street food’ from two London locations – Pop Brixton and Camden Market. It will doubtless be expanding very soon though.

How much?
£12, including masala fries and a drink.

The menu says:
“A spiced lamb patty served with a cool mint cumin riatha, mango pulp and an onion salsa.”

The hype says:
Atul Kochhar: “British Indian mark two is here – and Baba G’s is it!”; Burger Lad: “A unique burger with considerable punch that should be on any discerning burgerado’s list”; TripAdvisor: “Genuinely outstanding.”

We say?
Who likes a burger? Literally everyone. And who enjoys a curry? An even larger proportion of people, no doubt. The Michelin-starred Kochhar certainly agrees, as he awarded Baba G’s £300,000 of investment via the BBC’s Million Pound Menu back in January.

It’s been something of a slow-cooked success, though, as the company has been going for over a decade now, having changed its name from its original moniker of Bhangra Burgers when it started to add more dishes to the menu. As tempting as the ‘naanwiches’ sound, though, the crazy lamb jalfrezi burger is billed as being the signature dish…

… and on tasting one, it’s easy to say why. The cheeky chicken tikka burger is also recommended, but the lamb fuses more convincingly with the curry elements. The patty holds the spices perfectly, and this effect is only accentuated by the taste of the mango and riatha, and the texture of the onion salsa. All this and there’s still room for an onion bhaji inside the buttermilk bun.

While this may sound glutinous enough, make sure you also order the accompanying fries. Delicious enough with just the masala spice they’re been tossed in, the addition of yet more mango and raitha, plus optional chilli, means they somehow manage the seemingly impossible task of elevating this Bollywood-in-a-bap business to an even higher level of unmissability.

Should you believe the hype?
हाँ (or ‘yes’, as it’s also known). Unlike David Sneddon, Eldorado and the 1987 hurricane, Aunty has definitely got it right this time.